Here, we have placed the number of pairs of skis produced per month on the vertical axis and the number of snowboards produced per month on the horizontal axis. In drawing the production possibilities curve, we shall assume that the economy can produce only two goods and that the quantities of factors of production and the technology available to the economy are fixed. Figure 2.4 “Production Possibilities at Three Plants” shows production possibilities curves for each of the firm’s three plants. It can shift to ski production at a relatively low cost at first. It is not necessary that the production takes place only on the PP Curve. In Panel (a) we have a combined production possibilities curve for Alpine Sports, assuming that it now has 10 plants producing skis and snowboards. Two things could leave an economy operating at a point inside its production possibilities curve. Chapter 1: Economics: The Study of Choice, Chapter 2: Confronting Scarcity: Choices in Production, 2.3 Applications of the Production Possibilities Model, Chapter 4: Applications of Demand and Supply, 4.2 Government Intervention in Market Prices: Price Floors and Price Ceilings, Chapter 5: Elasticity: A Measure of Response, 5.2 Responsiveness of Demand to Other Factors, Chapter 6: Markets, Maximizers, and Efficiency, Chapter 7: The Analysis of Consumer Choice, 7.3 Indifference Curve Analysis: An Alternative Approach to Understanding Consumer Choice, 8.1 Production Choices and Costs: The Short Run, 8.2 Production Choices and Costs: The Long Run, Chapter 9: Competitive Markets for Goods and Services, 9.2 Output Determination in the Short Run, Chapter 11: The World of Imperfect Competition, 11.1 Monopolistic Competition: Competition Among Many, 11.2 Oligopoly: Competition Among the Few, 11.3 Extensions of Imperfect Competition: Advertising and Price Discrimination, Chapter 12: Wages and Employment in Perfect Competition, Chapter 13: Interest Rates and the Markets for Capital and Natural Resources, Chapter 14: Imperfectly Competitive Markets for Factors of Production, 14.1 Price-Setting Buyers: The Case of Monopsony, Chapter 15: Public Finance and Public Choice, 15.1 The Role of Government in a Market Economy, Chapter 16: Antitrust Policy and Business Regulation, 16.1 Antitrust Laws and Their Interpretation, 16.2 Antitrust and Competitiveness in a Global Economy, 16.3 Regulation: Protecting People from the Market, Chapter 18: The Economics of the Environment, 18.1 Maximizing the Net Benefits of Pollution, Chapter 19: Inequality, Poverty, and Discrimination, Chapter 20: Macroeconomics: The Big Picture, 20.1 Growth of Real GDP and Business Cycles, Chapter 21: Measuring Total Output and Income, Chapter 22: Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, 22.2 Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply: The Long Run and the Short Run, 22.3 Recessionary and Inflationary Gaps and Long-Run Macroeconomic Equilibrium, 23.2 Growth and the Long-Run Aggregate Supply Curve, Chapter 24: The Nature and Creation of Money, 24.2 The Banking System and Money Creation, Chapter 25: Financial Markets and the Economy, 25.1 The Bond and Foreign Exchange Markets, 25.2 Demand, Supply, and Equilibrium in the Money Market, 26.1 Monetary Policy in the United States, 26.2 Problems and Controversies of Monetary Policy, 26.3 Monetary Policy and the Equation of Exchange, 27.2 The Use of Fiscal Policy to Stabilize the Economy, Chapter 28: Consumption and the Aggregate Expenditures Model, 28.1 Determining the Level of Consumption, 28.3 Aggregate Expenditures and Aggregate Demand, Chapter 29: Investment and Economic Activity, Chapter 30: Net Exports and International Finance, 30.1 The International Sector: An Introduction, 31.2 Explaining Inflation–Unemployment Relationships, 31.3 Inflation and Unemployment in the Long Run, Chapter 32: A Brief History of Macroeconomic Thought and Policy, 32.1 The Great Depression and Keynesian Economics, 32.2 Keynesian Economics in the 1960s and 1970s, 32.3. Production Possibilities. 2009-09-14 05:11:40. An economy that is operating inside its production possibilities curve could, by moving onto it, produce more of all the goods and services that people value, such as food, housing, education, medical care, and music. To produce more of one good the production of the other good must be reduced and this happens due to scarcity of the resources. Production and employment fell. Economists conclude that it is better to be on the production possibilities curve than inside it. Economics Mcqs for test Preparation from Basic to Advance. Output began to grow after 1933, but the economy continued to have vast numbers of idle workers, idle factories, and idle farms. This is a result of transferring resources from the production of one good to another according to comparative advantage. Us the maximum number of pairs of skis/50 snowboards ) for individuals, firms, governments and economies. 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